Deathbed Murder Confession

Strange Rumour in Lincolnshire

A strange rumour, which we believe has its origin in Friskney, is in circulation relative to the mysterious disappearance of a boy named Enderby, some 15 or 16 years ago.

The lad was about 13 years of age; the adopted son of the late Mr Enderby, innkeeper, of Skegness.

On the morning of his disappearance, he arose between two and three o’clock to fetch up the horses to go to Louth with a load of corn; but after quitting the house was never seen or heard of again.

It was evident he had been in the field with the horses, for he had brought them through one gate and closed and fastened it; his cap also was, it is remembered, left in the field.

Every search was made without avail, and even conjecture at last had exhausted its own ample resources.

The remembrance of the event, however, still lived and lingered in men’s minds.

A few years since, a man of the name Milnes, of Croft, made some unintelligible reference to this event before he died, but nothing definite and conclusive could be gathered from his semi-delirious ravings.

However, a “navvie” called Candy Taylor, who had married a sister of Milnes, died very recently, and before his death made the following horrible disclosures:

As young Enderby was returning with the horses in all boyish joyousness at the expectation of going to Louth, he lighted upon Taylor and Milnes engaged in slaughtering a sheep; that, to prevent detection, they murdered the poor lad and buried his corpse in the sand about four miles off, at Ingoldmells Out-end.

These two fellows, Taylor and Milnes, were desperate characters, and the terror of the neighbourhood. – Boston Herald

Source: The Preston Guardian etc (Preston, England), Saturday, September 6, 1851

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s